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TOPIC: 7352/42 Radar Workshop

7352/42 Radar Workshop 18 Jan 2016 22:44 #11

  • 753jet
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The little box on the near end of the building shown (with the pretty blue plant pots by the centre door) could well be a power shed containing the very noisy AC Generators (115v , 400HZ) which also came relatively late into service to power the new radars , etc.
It looks like there's a normal power room at the far end with louvre doors . That may well have contained a standby generator too , as well as a battery charger ; batteries were used in some application tests for d.c. equipment which was a bit sensitive to rotating power supply noise during tests .
The radio bay at Nicosia until about 1964 was built into the side buildings of the Hangar at the end furthest away from the Troubled Trident . That had a thumping great diesel generator in an outside shack , us TASS fitters were charged with running the damn thing up on a regular basis , but afternoons only . As it was very hot in there , we nearly killed ourselves hand cranking the thing . Two of you grabbed the starting handle and wound it up to speed with all the valves lifted . When it was up to speed , you smartly slammed the valves shut and with any luck it started .
What was not allowed for was interpretation of English , especially by overheated sweaty airmen . Who weren't engine chaps .
There were two large cans in the shed , one marked "Diesel Oil" and the other marked "Oil for Diesel" . Of course , it was too easy to mark one Diesel Fuel and the other Diesel Lubricant . So the poor ground eng fitters would be called out to drain the fuel tank etc., to get rid of the innocently deposited oil .
No sah , not me , nevah did .
But do you think they would let us mark them in an unconfusing manner ? Nah . Not in the book , you see .

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7352/42 Radar Workshop 18 Jan 2016 22:44 #12

  • mbriscoe
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753jet wrote: A development engineer who I worked with back in the 70's told me about testing radars in some god forsaken place on the Atlantic coast during WW2 and after .
He made particular mention of the tight fisted wotsits who gave them a cloth screen (as he put it) to keep the weather out , but they needed easy access to the fresh air for rolling the radar in and out ; this would indicate a wheeled test bed . As he said , it was a bit of a time waster because sites for tests usually mean surveys and true heading locators for the tests to make sense . I believe he was on the tests for ASV (Mk.10 possibly)which was an Air-to-surface Vessel Radar . It could also have been the tests for Green Archer , a forerunner of Cymbeline Mortar Locating Radar .
I wonder if the picture you posted is the same test bed ?


It was relatively early in WWII (from what I remember), they tested over several paths on two(?) frequency bands. From memory there was this one, one at Portpatrick Radio, two in Pembrikeshire, One on the Lleyn, another on Snowdon, one (perhaps two) in Northern Ireland and I perhaos Isle of Man.

Described in here:

Wings Across the Border: v. 3: A History of Aviation in North Wales and the Northern Marches
Pratt, Derrick; Mike Grant
9781844940103

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Last Edit: by mbriscoe.

7352/42 Radar Workshop 19 Jan 2016 07:07 #13

  • PETERTHEEATER
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.........That had a thumping great diesel generator in an outside shack , us TASS fitters were charged with running the damn thing up on a regular basis , but afternoons only . As it was very hot in there , we nearly killed ourselves hand cranking the thing . Two of you grabbed the starting handle and wound it up to speed with all the valves lifted . When it was up to speed , you smartly slammed the valves shut and with any luck it started .........

That sounds like a 12 cylinder Lister diesel a popular power unit for generation in those RAF days.

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