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TOPIC: AIRFIELD FIRE ENGINE WANTED

AIRFIELD FIRE ENGINE WANTED 08 Dec 2008 20:48 #11

  • stevfire2
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have heard that "cat 9 "have recently supplied a 10 yr old major truck to ireland. maybe try them. if not, can only see manufacturers part exchanges / hire fleets being available.

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AIRFIELD FIRE ENGINE WANTED 10 Dec 2008 03:59 #12

  • Phillip Rhodes
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Ddear Brian

In your original post you fail to mention what size of aircraft your RFFS covers?

I haven’t come across MOD Aviation Publication 67 before, but know that the current RIV carries 600 gallons of water. That equates to CAT 3/4.

Although the TACR2 is getting on a bit, you can buy one for around £4k and spend £20k on virtually building a new vehicle (still cheaper than buying new). Two TACR2 can cover CAT 3 ops.

Although large CrTs are impressive you need a HGV licence to drive one, but you know that already. This has caused problems with a number of operators – unable to man their primary – having to rely on their RIV when people call in sick.

Does this £50k cover the cost of PPE for the crew?

The Mk10'e' is still your best bet for a Cat 3 or Cat 4 airfield. That said they are hard to come buy – with many going overseas. The main problem regards spares – which can be ludicrously expensive (£600 to replace a cracked rear axle).

Not sure about civvy vehicles.

I’m currently trying to find out about the MoD’s tender for a new vehicle to cover some of its VGS sites. Currently the RAF supply a 90 litre fire extinguisher to its glider sites around the UK and this is considered inappropriate. I’m unable to ascertain whether they require a full package (vehicle/manpower/servicing) or just the vehicle to be manned by VGS staff.

I would suggest that you consider building your own vehicle. I’m working on a CAT I vehicle, but alas it’s just a paper-exercise, as I’m unable to secure information from the MoD regarding the aforementioned VGS tender. My vehicle is based on a Defender and if built would carry 360 Litres (CAT 1).

There are a number of vehicles you can consider when designing your own CrT, including the Iveco Daily 4x4, which offers a generous payload (2,200Kg to 2,400Kg). The vehicle even comes in bright Maranello Red. Now, don’t snigger. Just ask anyone who’s had to pay for a respray. Check out: http://www.daily4x4.iveco.com/ for more details. The 1,200 Litre (CAT 3) tank could supply two side lines through an Angus pump, while you can easily build lockers for all your CAA compliant equipment. If you buy the twin cab you can take out the rear seats and install equipment racks/cage.

Just think of it as a large Defender 130 HiCap Twin Cab. PSP Safety Products (now Perren Engineering) produced a vehicle for the British Army using a Reynolds Boughton RB44 which carried a 700 Litre (CAT II) package. Your homebuild could be along those lines. Providing a RFFS isn’t about being self-sufficient – it’s about holding the fort until the local authority turn up, but you knew that too.

Without knowing the CAT of airfield you operate…

Email Steve Shirley (Manston Fire Museum) as he operates his own private RFFS service (provides cover at East Kirkby). He’s well respected and knows more than most when it comes to CrTs and airfields. FireTechUK are experts, but £50k wont buy you much these days (unless it’s a CAT 1 vehicle using a second-hand base vehicle). My only concern with building your own low CAT CrT is that it will need to be checked over by the Home Office (?) as being a safe vehicle, even though you haven’t actually cut any metal – just loaded up the back of a pick up.

Best Wishes

Phil Rhodes

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AIRFIELD FIRE ENGINE WANTED 10 Dec 2008 19:00 #13

  • canberra
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I think that MOD AP 67 may refer to Air Publication 67. Ive never heard of AP 67, Im guessing its to do with fire fighting.

And when you say 2 TACRs can cover cat 3 Im guessing that you mean the CAA cat 3? RAF/MOD fire cats are a bit different.

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